This Calorie Calculator is based on the Mifflin – St Jeor equation. With this equation, the Basal Metabolic Rate (BMR) is calculated.

Basal Metabolic Rate is the amount of energy expressed in calories that a person needs to keep the body functioning at rest. Some of those processes are breathing, blood circulation, controlling body temperature, cell growth, brain and nerve function, and contraction of muscles. BMR affects the rate that a person burns calories and ultimately whether that individual maintains, gains, or loses weight. The basal metabolic rate accounts for about 60 to 75% of the daily calorie expenditure by individuals. It is influenced by several factors. BMR typically declines by 1–2% per decade after age 20, mostly due to loss of fat-free mass, although the variability between individuals is high.

The Mifflin – St Jeor equation calculates the RESTING Metabolic Rate (RMR).

The Resting Metabolic Rate (RMR) is closely related to the Basal Metabolic Rate (BMR) and it is the amount of energy required to maintain the body’s normal metabolic activity, such as respiration, maintenance of body temperature, and digestion. Specifically, it is the amount of energy required at rest with no additional activity. The energy consumed is sufficient only for the functioning of the vital organs such as the heart, lungs, nervous system, kidneys, liver, intestine, sex organs, muscles, and skin.

The Calorie Calculator can be used to estimate the calories you need to consume each day. This calculator can also provide some simple guideline if you want to gain or lose weight. The best way to lose weight is through proper diet and exercise. Try not to lower your calorie intake by more than 1,000 calories per day, and try to lower your calorie intake gradually. Also, try to maintain your level of fiber intake and balance your other nutritional needs. The results of the Calorie Calculator are based on an estimated average.

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The body mass index (BMI)is a value derived from the mass (weight) and height of an individual. The BMI is defined as the body mass divided by the square of the body height and is universally expressed in units of kg/m2, resulting from mass in kilograms and height in meters. If pounds and inches are used, a conversion factor of 703 (kg/m2)/(lb/in2) must be applied.

The BMI is an attempt to quantify the amount of tissue mass (muscle, fat, and bone) in an individual, and then categorize that person as underweight, normal weight, overweight, or obese based on that value. However, there is some debate about where on the BMI scale the dividing lines between categories should be placed. Commonly accepted BMI ranges are underweight: under 18.5 kg/m2, normal weight: 18.5 to 25, overweight: 25 to 30, obese: over 30.

BMI provides a simple numeric measure of a person’s thickness or thinness, allowing health professionals to discuss weight problems more objectively with their patients. BMI was designed to be used as a simple means of classifying average sedentary (physically inactive) populations, with an average body composition. Some athletes have a high muscle to fat ratio and may have a BMI that is misleadingly high relative to their body fat percentage.

BMI Chart